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Adrenal fatigue, Recovery

Using the Polar H10 and A360/370 for Recovery Training

Yesterday, I reviewed the Morpheus Recovery Band. Today, I’ll talk about a suite of Polar devices/apps.

I’ve been using the Polar H10 chest strap the longest, both for morning heart rate variability (HRV) readings and for tracking exercise. I started using the Polar A360 in October for wrist-based heart rate tracking. The A360 isn’t made anymore, but the A370 is very similar and has nice new features like all-day heart rate monitoring and GPS. Then I also need two free apps: Polar Beat (for the H10) and Polar Flow (for the A360 and bringing all the data together). I know it sounds kinda clunky, but in practice, it’s pretty simple. Here’s how I use all of this to guide my active recovery.

Goals

My current goal is to recondition after a long illness. One of the problems with adrenal fatigue is that if you overdo physical or emotional stress, you can knock your recovery back days or weeks. It took me a year to figure out that 20 minutes of gardening, sweeping the deck, or moderate exercises like a few pushups and situps constituted “entirely too much exercise.” I would wake up feeling good, overdo it, and get knocked back to the couch for several days. It was incredibly frustrating because I rarely felt good two days in a row. For, like, two years.

So I wanted a way to quantify how much work I was doing and have some data to help me understand how much was too much. The key data I needed were my morning heart rate variability (HRV) scores, and some way to measure how much energy I was actually expending not just during workouts, but during daily activities, chores, walking to meetings, etc.

Polar H10

For HRV

I’ve already talked about measuring my HRV. I largely did that with the H10, though Welltory also let me measure it with my finger on my phone. (I ended up abandoning Welltory – it seemed less accurate over time and didn’t give me much uniquely useful info.)

For exercise tracking

  • Use with the Polar Beats app. Start the app, tell it what kind of exercise you are doing, and press “Start.”
  • If you leave the app open, you can see your heart rate moment-to-moment on your phone – if you can put your phone someplace visible while you exercise.
  • Five “zones” are color-coded from 1-5 based on your maximum recommended heart rate (220 minus your age).
    • For me, Zone 1 (50-60% of max HR) is 88-105 bpm because my max HR should be 176.
    • Zone 5 is 90-100% of your max (158+ for me), and I avoid it like the plague at this stage of my reconditioning.
  • Building on what I learned from the Morpheus band, Polar Zones 1-3 are recovery, Zone 4 is conditioning, and Zone 5 is overreaching. In practice, I aim a little lower – I think my conditioning zone probably starts around 130 bmp, which is 75% max or “Zone 2.5” and I don’t like to go above 150/Zone 3.5/85% max right now.

Polar A360/370

polar-a370-white-600x600The 360 and 370 work basically the same way. You can use them as a wrist-based HR tracker for exercise, though it is not sensitive enough to track HRV (use the H10 for that). It is supposedly very accurate for walking and jogging, but less good for weightlifting and cycling. It also has an all-day activity monitor, and a sleep monitoring feature I’ve not used much at all.

The reason I got it is because I wanted to see my HR during exercise on my wrist, not my phone – I often use my phone to play workout videos and can’t see both apps at once. I also wanted to be able to track exercise on the fly during the day – e.g., walking to a meeting, or giving a presentation – because I suspected that many of my daily activities were more strenuous than I’d realized. It works great for this – I can see the same fitness zones on my wrist that I had been getting from the H10, and I regularly set it to record my activity while I’m at work.

You track day-long activity on the Polar Flow app. This will also take in info from Polar Beats, so if you do use the H10 for certain exercises, all the data gets collected into one place and count toward your daily activity. What’s slightly confusing is that “activity” is broken into different “zones” than training. Here’s a table…

Polar Training Zone

Morpheus Recovery Zone

HR range (BPM are for age 44)

Polar Flow Activity Level

0

Total rest

<88bpm

·        Resting + sitting

1

Recovery

50-60% max

88-104bpm

·        Low

2

Recovery

60-70% max
105-122

·      Low-Medium intensity (breakpoint around 65%)

3

Recovery

70-80% max
123-139

·      Medium-High intensity (breakpoint around 75%)

4

Conditioning

80-90% max
140-157

·    High intensity

5

Overreaching

90-100% max
158-176

·    Very high intensity

Danger

Galloping heart

177+

·    Dangerous during recovery from adrenal fatigue

Polar_Flow_Analyze-1_0_0To keep things simple, I mostly just look at the Polar Activity chart during the day. On “good” days, when my morning HRV reading is 8-10 on Elite HRV and 7.5 or above on HRV4Training, I go for 15 minutes of “high intensity” activity (HR above about 130). On days my HRV reading is around 6.5-7.5, I avoid high-intensity activity entirely but generally try to get in some low-medium intensity activity around Zone 2/HR 105-120. On days when my HRV says I’m overtaxed, I really try to rest as much as possible, including having my husband drop me off in front of my building at work, always taking the elevator, and going to bed an hour early.

I improved steadily through 2018, and I am MUCH better able to handle physical activity now! In Feb. 2018, I was pleased that that my edge was to do 20 minutes of gardening on Saturday AND Sunday, and feel fine on Monday. In September 2018, my edge was 3.5 hours a day of vigorous t’ai chi, on a Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday, and though I was a little tired the following week, it wasn’t a real setback. I don’t think I’ve come close to pushing past my physical boundaries since then (3 months), though I am learning the toll stress and allergies take on my HRV scores. But that’s another post. 🙂

 

Adrenal fatigue, Recovery

Using Morpheus for Recovery Training

In a previous post, I talked about basic concepts of recovery activities. I wanted to update you with a couple new months of data gleaned from two additional tools: the Morpheus Recovery Band and the Polar A360/370 fitness monitor.  I’ll review the Polar tomorrow.

About Morpheus

The Morpheus band and system are the only gizmos I know of that actually calculate how much a particular workout helps you recover, or knocks you back. (Update Feb. 2019: Biostrap also appears to do this, as well) Joel Jamieson, the creator, has done a ton of work around active recovery and avoiding overtraining. Probably 95% of what I know about recovery training came from his info. So I was very excited to try this tool.

You take a morning reading with the Morpheus band (on arm or leg) and get a baseline score and your set of target heart rates. There are three zones: recovery, conditioning, and overtraining, each with a heart rate range based on your age and your current state of fitness.  Then you exercise – using the Morpheus band, or another HRV monitor such as the Polar 10 chest strap – and at the end of the workout, it calculates your recovery points. For me, I was always trying to maximize recovery points, and generally avoid negative recovery point (a sign that you worked really hard – which is great for hardcore athletes but not good for people desperately trying to avoid overexertion as they recover from a long illness).

What’s awesome

  • Recovery scores were super-helpful! I learned that my body is “recovering” at much higher heart rates than I’d imagined.
    • My max recommended heart rate is about 176 (220-age), so I’d thought a good “recovery” heart rate maxed out at 110. But no – I was reliably seeing high recovery scores up to about 125-130bpm. And critically, I was seeing higher recovery scores at 125 than at 110.
    • I did take with a grain of salt Morpheus’s recommendation that on good days, I would be recovering up to 143bpm – that felt like way too much exertion for me at this point in time.
    • What I thought were good “recovery” activities (seated yoga, light t’ai chi) actually were calculated as “rest” and had little or no impact on my recovery scores.
  • The upshot is that I dramatically increased the intensity of activity I was doing, and continued to feel better.

What’s OK

  • Morning baseline readings were also helpful, but I was already getting very similar information from my chest strap and Elite HRV/HRV4Training apps. All of them seemed to agree pretty well.
  • The daily variation of HR zones was less useful than I’d expected, because they were nearly always the same. On a good day, the breakpoint between recovery and conditioning was about 143. On a bad day, it was about 135, which was not a very meaningful difference to me. In addition, this corresponds pretty well to the Polar zones 1-3 for recovery, 4 for conditioning, and 5 for overload.

Frustrations

  • The app doesn’t let me easily track HRV changes over time. It’s very much a “what should I do today” sort of device.
  • The app gives no information on LF/HF readings, which are useful for understanding how my parasympathetic system is/is not engaging. I don’t want to give up that info, so every morning, I was taking 3 simultaneous readings with two different devices.
  • The band is impossible to use during exercise. It was constantly slipping off my arm, and I don’t even sweat heavily. So I had to use my Polar chest strap during all exercise, but the Morpheus armband for the initial morning reading. (Update: Morpheus apparently now has a chest strap, which might help with this.)
  • You can’t just take a reading to see how you are doing “right now,” except for once a day in the morning. There were many times when I’d come home from work, and want to get info on how much my day had taken out of me, but it’s not set up to do that. That info was somewhat reflected in my next morning’s reading, but it didn’t help me narrow down non-exercise stressors.
  • The app and community were definitely focused on high-performing athletes and avid gymgoers. No one could really answer questions I had from the perspective of someone in deep recovery mode.

The Verdict

I ended up returning the Morpheus during its 60-day no-questions-asked return period. I do still occasionally miss the recovery score readings, but I wasn’t willing to pay $150 to keep having them – especially since I seemed to be able to track that data solely with my Polar chest strap.

Adrenal fatigue, Recovery

Adrenal fatigue Pt. 4: Recovery Activities

See Part 1.

Once I got to the point where I could work full days 5x/wk, I started feeling strong enough to begin exercising. But I kept overdoing it, in shockingly short periods of time (e.g., 20 minutes of gardening on Saturday left me tired through Monday). Following the guidelines of Active Recovery, I set the following exercise goals:

  • Prioritize recovery and stress reduction over building strength
  • Continue improving resilience (i.e., recover faster)
  • Learn what each workout zone feels like
  • If energy is good (judge by feel and HRV numbers), THEN alternate “long slow” and “strength/cardio” workouts. NO set frequency or schedule, to avoid overdoing it, or feeling guilt
  • Work on posture and breathing to increase available energy

I take an HRV reading every morning and compare that with how I feel. I use a Polar 10 chest strap gadget and the Elite HRV and HRV4Training apps simultaneously (I know, I know…I’m comparing them…gimme a break) to determine my morning HRV.  If most signs point toward needing to take it easy, I rest or do a recovery activity in zone 1 (or low zone 2 since it’s often hard to stay in zone 1). If both readings are good, then I do exercise in zones 2-3. If I feel great, I aim for zones 3-4, but no more than 15 minutes at a time and no more than 2x/week at this point.

I wear the Polar chest strap or Polar A360 fitness watch to track the intensity of my workouts and some of my regular activities, like canning or walking up stairs or giving a presentation at work. Its app shows my heart rate AND the zone I’m in from moment to moment, then tallies up my time in each zone per workout and day/week/month. Here are some sample activities:

Zone

Function

HR range

Activities Aug. ’18

0

Total rest –

Feels stretchy

<88bpm

·        Sitting, sleeping

·        Seated yoga

1

Active Recovery –

Easy motion; often hard to stay this low

88-104

·        Gentle sun salutations; seated active yoga

·        Tai chi warm-up

·        Walk to meeting

2

Light – base fitness – feels like “I’m actually doing
exercise”

105-122

·      Flowy tai chi

·     1 flight stairs

·     “Taking a walk”

·     Giving Reflex

·     Weeding

·     Slowest elliptical

3

Steady state – improve aerobic – feels like I’m working hard

123-139

·     Brisk walk

·     Moderate elliptical

·     2 flights stairs

4

Tempo – speed/stamina – breathing very hard

140-157

·    Mowing flat part of yard

·    Cardio workout

5

Max – increase max performance – starting to worry

158-176

·     Mowing slope

Danger

Galloping heart

177+


 

 

If you want to try this at home, there are tons of gadgets and apps out there. You absolutely need something that can measure heart rate variability – most FitBits and whatnot don’t do this, even if they can track your heart rate. I think HRV4Training can actually measure HRV using your phone – so that can be a good way to get started. It’s also super helpful to have a way to track your heart rate (pulse) as you exercise, so you know immediately if you need to slow down. I use the Polar A360, because it pairs nicely with the Polar chest strap, but if you’re using a phone app for HRV and have a Fitbit or similar, you’ve probably got all the data you need.

Short version: Using HRV for adrenal fatigue recovery

Your goal is to learn how much you can do without “overdoing it,” then restrict yourself to that amount of activity. This will be very hard. You may be surprised how little you can do at first. Take heart! You will improve faster if you can prevent overdoing it in the first place.

  • Take your heart rate variability each morning before you start your day (use the bathroom, then lie back down and take the reading). HRV is very personal, so it’s hard to tell you what number to look for, but after a week or two, you should be able to tell what “good” numbers look like for you.
  • Use the pulse meter to learn what activities put you in what heart rate zones. I was very surprised to learn that things I thought were very easy (like light gardening, picking beans, watering) put me in high Zone 3, and things I thought were moderate exercise (like seated yoga) were so light, they didn’t even register as light exercise.
  • Use the day’s reading to guide your activity that day.
    • If the app says you can train as per usual, aim for exercise in zone 3 (70% max heart rate). Start with no more than 15 minutes, twice a week, until you dial in what tires you out.
    • If the app recommends active recovery, aim for zones 1-2 (50-60% max heart rate).
    • If the app recommends rest, not only should you not raise your heart rate to Zone 1 with exercise, you should take steps to reduce other physical activity. Avoid stairs. Let someone else cook dinner. Go to bed an hour early. Do breathing exercises. Receive bodywork.
  • If you feel tired the morning after a certain type of workout, you’ve overdone it. Make a note and adjust your regimen accordingly.

I had to dial back my activity three or four weeks in a row until I got to a point where I had a sustainable activity regimen. At first, it felt pathetic – I barely felt like I was doing anything – but as I stuck to it, I got out of the overdo-then-crash cycle, and my overall strength improved rapidly.

Adrenal fatigue, recipes, Recovery

Adrenal Fatigue Pt. 3: Active Recovery

The last three months or so, I’ve been reading about and doing a lot of “active recovery” activities. While reconditioning after my long bout with respiratory infections and adrenal fatigue, I realized I really needed to restart exercising without overdoing it and just making myself more tired. The two concepts I’ve found to be fruitful as I look into this are Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Active Recovery .

I wanted to share some things I’ve found helpful. Maybe you will, too. Remember: I am not a doctor; talk to yours before you start. There are some conditions, such as Myalgic Encephalopathy or “ME,” sometimes called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, that can be made very much worse by trying to stage back in exercise. So please be careful.

Background Concepts

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) refers to the amount of time between your heartbeats. If your resting heart rate is 60 beats per minute, that doesn’t mean your heart beats exactly one time per second. The time between the first two beats may be 1.00002 second, then .99998 second, then 1 second, etc. The amount of difference the time between your heart beats is your HRV. There are actually a bunch of different measurements that go into an HRV number, but that’s the basic idea.

Generally speaking, the higher your HRV is, the healthier you are. There are apps and devices that let you measure this easily at home. I’ve found tracking at my HRV scores to be very helpful in showing me how my body is doing, including:

  • What activities help me recover faster, and what activities wear me out
  • What type of activity I should pursue on a given day: rest, gentle exercise, or vigorous exercise
  • How to better tell how I’m doing from how I feel (it’s not always clear!)

I’ll go into more detail on these later.

Once I was able to get a handle on what I needed (rest/recovery/training), I needed to figure out activities for each of those needs. Rest is pretty easy – read soothing books and sleep a lot. The other two are harder, because they can overlap.

Enter “active recovery.” This is the idea that very gentle exercise can be more beneficial than straight rest in certain circumstances. I found a lot of work on active recovery coming from athletic trainers.  They are generally working with healthy people who are trying to take their performance from “very good” to “exceptional,” so I take their specific training regimens with a huge grain of salt. But their guidelines have been working well. The super-short version is, when you do active recovery, you want to keep your heart rate between 50-70% of your maximum heart rate (or “Zone 1 and 2”). For me, that’s between 88 and 125 beats per minute. (HR zone info here.) For other kinds of training, you aim for higher zones. I use a heart rate tracker and app while I’m exercising so I can target the right zone. It’s actually pretty hard to stay in the recovery zone, because when I’m tired, sitting at my desk and going to meetings can put me in or above the recovery threshold! No wonder I was having trouble overdoing it…

The other piece of recovery training is that breathing is incredibly important. I’ve come to appreciate yogic breathing and meditation in a whole new way. Likewise, body alignment and energy flow activities have also been super helpful.

Tune in for tomorrow’s installment where I’ll go into agonizing detail about those. 🙂

Adrenal fatigue, recipes, Recovery

Adrenal Fatigue Recovery, Pt. 2: Menu

For background, see Adrenal Recovery, Pt. 1

Goals:

  • Deeply nutritious food that’s fairly easy to prepare
  • Protein, fat, and complex carbs every time you eat
  • Avoid sugar and refined carbs like white bread
  • Go ahead and eat salt – you need the sodium
  • Keep blood sugar steady – so eat frequently (even if you have to get up and eat in the middle of the night)

For the week, prepare:

Breakfasts

  • Meaty:
    • Pick any 2-4 oz of meat: burger “sliders,” pork tenderloin, no-nitrate hot dogs (e.g., Applegate Natural), baked turkey breast, or a grilled chicken thigh
    • Complex carbs: Sprouted whole grain bread (or bun) or sweet potato slices
    • A vegetable, if you can swing it: Salt-n-garlic beans or steamed carrot sticks
  • Veggie:
    • Calabaza queso on corn tortillas
    • Corn tortillas with refried beans and cheese
    • Raw carrot
    • Eggs are great, if you can have them
  • Avocado toast + protein

Dinners

Soup, stew, etc.

Pan dinners

Baked/Pressure/Big Batch

Super Quick

  • Rotisserie chicken and salt’n’garlic beans or Brussels sprouts (I probably ate this meal once a week for a year – use leftovers for chicken salad and broth)
  • Salmon burgers with veg
  • Beef tips (keep the serving of mashed potatoes small, and add lots of butter)
  • Chicken salad on salad, with Mary’s crackers or Triscuits

To have on hand

  • Calabaza queso, Zucchini butter, hummus, or Baba ganouj
  • Triscuits
  • Nuts/Kind bars
  • Meatballs, Grilled chicken thighs, and/or hot dogs
  • Coconut bars (omit honey but keep choc chips – 1 g sugar per serving)
  • Sweet potato wedges
  • Praeger’s veg patties (check varieties)
    • Cali burger
    • Greens burger has some potato flakes mid-way down the list; lowest carb option
    • Asian burger has some potato flakes way down the list
    • Bibimbop burger has some potato flakes way down the list; higher carb
    • Others have too much white stuff and/or egg

Freezer-stocking meals

Dining Out

  • Japanese
    • Agedashi Tofu
    • Miso
    • Edamame
    • Yakitori (sauce on side)
    • Hand rolls and brown rice on rolls
    • Chicken Terriyaki w/o sauce
  • Chinese
    • Get brown rice or don’t eat rice at restaurant
    • Moo goo gai pan
    • Hunan chicken
    • Chicken and vegetables
  • Session Room
    • Sub corn tortilla for slider bun
    • Chicken tacos
  • Qdoba
    • Burrito with brown rice
    • Tacos
  • Great Plains
    • Burger, 1/2 wheat bun, sweet potato fries
  • Noodles & Co
    • Chicken Veracruz salad
    • They don’t have ww noodles anymore, and most stuff has a lot of sugar.
Adrenal fatigue, recipes, Recovery

Adrenal Fatigue Recovery, Pt. 1: Background

In 2016-17, I was pretty sick. It started with pneumonia and got worse from there. At some point, my doctor diagnosed me with adrenal fatigue – basically, I’d been stressed out for so long my adrenal glands couldn’t keep up their usual endocrine dance. Some people debate whether adrenal fatigue is  “real” diagnosis, and I’m not interested in arguing. I do know that by following these suggestions, I did feel better, and when I didn’t, I felt much, much worse. It took me about 2 years of alternating small improvements and plateaus to feel mostly healthy.

There’s a lot of material out there about the condition, and if you think you have it, I hope you’re working with a health care provider. What I want to do here is share the guidelines I followed and the recipes I relied on so if you are going through the same thing, you don’t have to expend your limited energy finding recipes.

My Guidelines

As always: I am not a doctor. Your mileage may vary. Listen to your body and your health care provider. The guidelines my doc gave me were:

  • Reduce or eliminate the source of the stress.
  • Find something to smile about, laugh at, and enjoy every day.
  • Be in bed before 10pm and nap as much as you want (without disturbing nighttime sleep).
  • Rest twice a day (midmorning and midafternoon) for 15-20 minutes in a reclined position. I don’t know what the magic is, but being horizontal makes a HUGE difference.
  • Gentle exercise only – don’t tire yourself.
  • Drink 2 liters salted water (a big pinch of real sea salt and maybe a squeeze of lime in a glass of water), rehydration solution, and/or broth daily
  • Don’t eat foods you are sensitive or allergic to
  • Have plenty of sodium
  • Don’t let blood sugar crash

Adrenal fatigue recovery eating plan

Keeping blood sugar steady is incredibly important.  For me, this is what it took to not let my blood sugar crash:

  • Have protein, fat, and complex carbs at every meal.
    • Aim for 20+g protein at breakfast.
    • Don’t go hog wild, but don’t fear carbs, either. You need that easy blood sugar.
  • Eat snacks as needed – including getting up in the night to eat if I wake up hungry. I highly recommend keeping a batch of these turkey/beef meatballs in the freezer – two of these are a perfect overnight snack.

I also figured out two years into this that I had a gut full of candida, which was making it very hard to keep my blood sugar steady and to sleep through the night. So, when treating that, I also added the usual anti-candida rules:

  • No white rice, white flour, white pasta, white potatoes, fruit, or sweeteners of any kind
  • …except a 5g sugar treat each day to keep me sane, e.g. 8 dark chocolate chips.

You may or may not have this issue.

Method

Of course, it takes energy to feed yourself well, and that’s just what you don’t have. So having a plan help. When possible, I’d prep this stuff once a week:

  • A vegetable-heavy soup in good broth (usually eaten as mid-morning or mid-afternoon snack)
  • A big batch of turkey-beef meatballs or grilled chicken thighs (usually eaten at breakfast or middle of the night)
  • And if possible, a big batch of cooked vegetables or freezing some pre-made meals to have for lunches

And then dinners were from this list, which I keep adding to under the tag “good_carb”. I’m going to sort/link some specific recipes in my next post.